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Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Rain, toadstools, mosquitoes and drought

I live in an area that is suffering from at least a severe drought but that also has had a lot rain over the last month.  The result of this combination is that some of our large, old trees are stressed and losing leaves or have red leaves in August.  At the same time we are seeing a bumper crop of strange mustard and bright red colored toadstools and several types of regular and fluted mushrooms.  And the mosquitoes have returned full force!  Until now it was just too hot and dry for them to be much of a problem this summer.

About ten days ago I tried to purchase spray to use on our yard to control the mosquitoes.  It works really well if you spray every 6 to 8 weeks and you just attach a mixer to the hose and get to work.  The big box stores didn't have any so I ordered it through Amazon.  Now I am waiting and waiting for it to come and then to have a no wind, non-rainy day when I can spray the property.  Meanwhile the mosquitoes are multiplying like, well, mosquitoes!

Although I don't live in an agricultural area, the drought is no laughing matter for us either.  Our reservoirs are low once again and I expect that food prices will skyrocket once the impact of the terrible corn crop and other drought related farm impacts hit the food supply chain.  When I was grocery shopping this morning I was checking to see if we are getting any of the meat sales predicted as farmers thin their herds due to lack of feed.  We haven't had any yet.  Fortunately we can afford to spend more on food but millions in the world cannot.  All I can do is donate to local charities that help those who are impacted and need food security.


2 comments:

  1. What you are describing is very similar to here and other parts of the Midwest. This next year will be very telling.

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    1. The photos I have seen of Midwestern crops and baked land are scary. I think a lot of people are going to suffer financially unfortunately. We are just hoping no large trees die as taking them down costs a lot.

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