Thursday, February 21, 2013

Part 2: Preparing for Retirement - Do you plan to work?

My Hubby plans to work for pay after he "retires" after 20 years in his current job. I joke that it is because he can't even get through a three day weekend in town without going into the office because he can't think of anything else to do. All his hobbies/interests have fallen by the wayside. While I honestly think that is part of his reason for wanting to continue to work I do believe the real reasons are that he finds his work very interesting, has great colleagues and enjoys what he does. Most of us aren't so lucky.

Then there are those who have a choice between working and being broke. I'd work too in that situation. NPR is doing a series on working in retirement years and this is the latest article -When a bad economy means working forever.

It is interesting that even this person talks about the non-financial benefits of working - being around people, continuing to learn, etc. I'd like those things but I don't want to be tied to a work schedule right now. Perhaps when seeing family members no longer requires travel across the country I'll be more interested. I would like the other benefits though and am looking for ways to build them into my life along with more structure to my days.

Do you expect to work for pay after retirement age either because you want to or because you will need the income?


13 comments:

  1. I have been retired since early 2007. I help my son and his wife with their children so I work but not for pay. I don't intend to have a paying job. I am fortunate in that I have a nice retirement package from the State.

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    1. You are fortunate both to have the financial means you need and to be near your family.

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  2. Juhli, you and your husband might get some good information on how to make the social and mental transition to retirement by reading The Joy of Not Working by Ernie Zelinski. It's a great primer on how to re-identify those passions we all have, but that too often get buried and forgotten after years of being under an employer's 40 hour a week thumb.

    The key is to seek out new opportunities, and to keep doing do until your plate is as full as you care to make it.

    I'm now at a point where almost every new activity I get involved in provides one or two additional ideas to consider. As an example, I went on a free tour of a NASA lab yesterday, and learned that they do once a month free evening lectures on a variety of fascinating topics. There's another evening filled should I wish to proceed.

    No, under no circumstance other than the obvious one of financial need, would I return to paid employment. It's too much fun out here! :-)

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    1. Good point. Was the talk at JPL? We used to go there for programs when we lived in Glendale, CA. I sure do miss all there is to do in CA!

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  3. I work as a substitute teacher until I find a child who cannot read. I then tutor him (all have been boys) until fluency. Then I go back to subbing.
    Works for me!
    My husband just loves to do things around the house. No more paid work for him- ever.
    We don't live close to museums and out universities are still expensive. We travel out to our kids to do any other hands on learning.

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    1. Sounds like you have found the right balance for yourselves.

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  4. I think this depends on so many things, including the work and your relationship to it. Some people are invigorated by and enjoy their jobs. My husand was one of those people, and so he wasnt particular interested in earlyretirement (he also had many hobbies including skiing, officiating sports, and so on). I fully believe that we can do both. and that both have value. I think it also depends what your hobbies or interests are outside of work, and so many other things.

    I have a friend retired from TI. He is hobby photographer, loves to work on his house and has many hobbies including multiple grandchildren ( they married early). He now drives a bus. He likes the kids, its just a few hours a day, and can take time off to travel or do other things as the mood strikes (and of course he doesnt work about a third of the year. No need, he just likes to.

    In my case I have two hobbies, I am prolific at both and so it is both an outlet for a little money and a chance to make as many things as I want without be overloaded. Im not one who think s that working is bad in any way or form. actually even though I was a fairly early retiree I sometimes have to laugh at the "off with the shackles' because so many folks I know dont feel that way!

    that said, I do think the best route to a sucessful retirement is to have hobbies and interests outside of work before you retire to build on.

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    1. You are right about the best mix being different for different people and situations!

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  5. Sorry, the above is from me. somehow I was logged into sons account!

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  6. I find myself thinking I'd like to continue to work part time in retirement. I'm not much of a traveler, and I really like getting a pay check. ;)!

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    1. There is a lot of value to continuing to work including that pay check.

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  7. Towards the end of each month I like to adventure out and visit some blogs other then my coffee pals and or people who do photo hunts.
    I pop over from “Carla....My ½ dozen daily....If husband and I weren't thrifty we would have to work. He is only receiving $750 on social security but we do have a little bit of other income...the $750 is the main source of retirement.
    But yes we or least I will pick up work here and there.
    Let just say we don't have to be mistreated by any employer....Coffee is on.

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    1. Thanks for visiting! I am very impressed that you can live on that income.

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